etsy:

The Art of Staying Aloft: a photo series by Gloria Wilson of Small Mysteries.
etsy:

The Art of Staying Aloft: a photo series by Gloria Wilson of Small Mysteries.
etsy:

The Art of Staying Aloft: a photo series by Gloria Wilson of Small Mysteries.
etsy:

The Art of Staying Aloft: a photo series by Gloria Wilson of Small Mysteries.
etsy:

The Art of Staying Aloft: a photo series by Gloria Wilson of Small Mysteries.
etsy:

The Art of Staying Aloft: a photo series by Gloria Wilson of Small Mysteries.

etsy:

The Art of Staying Aloft: a photo series by Gloria Wilson of Small Mysteries.

boonduchess:


image

WE HAVE REACHED TERMINAL VELOCITY

(Source: quagmath)

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

awkwardsituationist:

though sea urchins don’t have eyes, they are covered in photoreceptors which collectively act as a retina, effectively making their entire bodies one big compound eye. sea urchins, one of the few marine organisms to have their genome sequenced, have about 23,000 genes (like a human), several of which are associated with sight, including those that govern the development of animal eyes. 
"comparing all the genes of the sea urchin, it’s actually quite similar to humans," said george weinstock, who led the sequencing project. they are one of the few invertebrates on the human branch of the evolutionary tree. yet interestingly, they seem to be the only example of a deuterostome to have the rhabdomeric light sensors associated with protostomes, suggesting that rhabdomeric light detectors have been the norm for eyes throughout much of the animal kingdom’s history.
"we think of animals that have a head with centralized nervous systems and all their sense organs on top as being the ones capable of sophisticated behavior, but we’re finding more and more some animals can do pretty complex behaviors using a completely different style," notes sönke johnsen, a marine biologist at duke university who conducted the study on sea urchin vision. 
the way that urchins apparently carry out eyesight - with a diffuse nerve net, where no region looks like a central processing unit - reflects how scientists are now often designing robots. “they’re finding it might be a lot better with a distributed system with many little processors and simpler sensors and simple rules, which end up creating fairly complicated behaviors as emergent properties.” [see: starlings post]” 
photos of sea urchin tests up close by paul richman. when alive, tube feet would be seen coming from the holes, which the sea urchin uses primarily for sight, with the smaller dents seen in the tests, also containing photoreceptors, used for shading and blocking light. text sources. 
awkwardsituationist:

though sea urchins don’t have eyes, they are covered in photoreceptors which collectively act as a retina, effectively making their entire bodies one big compound eye. sea urchins, one of the few marine organisms to have their genome sequenced, have about 23,000 genes (like a human), several of which are associated with sight, including those that govern the development of animal eyes. 
"comparing all the genes of the sea urchin, it’s actually quite similar to humans," said george weinstock, who led the sequencing project. they are one of the few invertebrates on the human branch of the evolutionary tree. yet interestingly, they seem to be the only example of a deuterostome to have the rhabdomeric light sensors associated with protostomes, suggesting that rhabdomeric light detectors have been the norm for eyes throughout much of the animal kingdom’s history.
"we think of animals that have a head with centralized nervous systems and all their sense organs on top as being the ones capable of sophisticated behavior, but we’re finding more and more some animals can do pretty complex behaviors using a completely different style," notes sönke johnsen, a marine biologist at duke university who conducted the study on sea urchin vision. 
the way that urchins apparently carry out eyesight - with a diffuse nerve net, where no region looks like a central processing unit - reflects how scientists are now often designing robots. “they’re finding it might be a lot better with a distributed system with many little processors and simpler sensors and simple rules, which end up creating fairly complicated behaviors as emergent properties.” [see: starlings post]” 
photos of sea urchin tests up close by paul richman. when alive, tube feet would be seen coming from the holes, which the sea urchin uses primarily for sight, with the smaller dents seen in the tests, also containing photoreceptors, used for shading and blocking light. text sources. 
awkwardsituationist:

though sea urchins don’t have eyes, they are covered in photoreceptors which collectively act as a retina, effectively making their entire bodies one big compound eye. sea urchins, one of the few marine organisms to have their genome sequenced, have about 23,000 genes (like a human), several of which are associated with sight, including those that govern the development of animal eyes. 
"comparing all the genes of the sea urchin, it’s actually quite similar to humans," said george weinstock, who led the sequencing project. they are one of the few invertebrates on the human branch of the evolutionary tree. yet interestingly, they seem to be the only example of a deuterostome to have the rhabdomeric light sensors associated with protostomes, suggesting that rhabdomeric light detectors have been the norm for eyes throughout much of the animal kingdom’s history.
"we think of animals that have a head with centralized nervous systems and all their sense organs on top as being the ones capable of sophisticated behavior, but we’re finding more and more some animals can do pretty complex behaviors using a completely different style," notes sönke johnsen, a marine biologist at duke university who conducted the study on sea urchin vision. 
the way that urchins apparently carry out eyesight - with a diffuse nerve net, where no region looks like a central processing unit - reflects how scientists are now often designing robots. “they’re finding it might be a lot better with a distributed system with many little processors and simpler sensors and simple rules, which end up creating fairly complicated behaviors as emergent properties.” [see: starlings post]” 
photos of sea urchin tests up close by paul richman. when alive, tube feet would be seen coming from the holes, which the sea urchin uses primarily for sight, with the smaller dents seen in the tests, also containing photoreceptors, used for shading and blocking light. text sources. 
awkwardsituationist:

though sea urchins don’t have eyes, they are covered in photoreceptors which collectively act as a retina, effectively making their entire bodies one big compound eye. sea urchins, one of the few marine organisms to have their genome sequenced, have about 23,000 genes (like a human), several of which are associated with sight, including those that govern the development of animal eyes. 
"comparing all the genes of the sea urchin, it’s actually quite similar to humans," said george weinstock, who led the sequencing project. they are one of the few invertebrates on the human branch of the evolutionary tree. yet interestingly, they seem to be the only example of a deuterostome to have the rhabdomeric light sensors associated with protostomes, suggesting that rhabdomeric light detectors have been the norm for eyes throughout much of the animal kingdom’s history.
"we think of animals that have a head with centralized nervous systems and all their sense organs on top as being the ones capable of sophisticated behavior, but we’re finding more and more some animals can do pretty complex behaviors using a completely different style," notes sönke johnsen, a marine biologist at duke university who conducted the study on sea urchin vision. 
the way that urchins apparently carry out eyesight - with a diffuse nerve net, where no region looks like a central processing unit - reflects how scientists are now often designing robots. “they’re finding it might be a lot better with a distributed system with many little processors and simpler sensors and simple rules, which end up creating fairly complicated behaviors as emergent properties.” [see: starlings post]” 
photos of sea urchin tests up close by paul richman. when alive, tube feet would be seen coming from the holes, which the sea urchin uses primarily for sight, with the smaller dents seen in the tests, also containing photoreceptors, used for shading and blocking light. text sources. 
awkwardsituationist:

though sea urchins don’t have eyes, they are covered in photoreceptors which collectively act as a retina, effectively making their entire bodies one big compound eye. sea urchins, one of the few marine organisms to have their genome sequenced, have about 23,000 genes (like a human), several of which are associated with sight, including those that govern the development of animal eyes. 
"comparing all the genes of the sea urchin, it’s actually quite similar to humans," said george weinstock, who led the sequencing project. they are one of the few invertebrates on the human branch of the evolutionary tree. yet interestingly, they seem to be the only example of a deuterostome to have the rhabdomeric light sensors associated with protostomes, suggesting that rhabdomeric light detectors have been the norm for eyes throughout much of the animal kingdom’s history.
"we think of animals that have a head with centralized nervous systems and all their sense organs on top as being the ones capable of sophisticated behavior, but we’re finding more and more some animals can do pretty complex behaviors using a completely different style," notes sönke johnsen, a marine biologist at duke university who conducted the study on sea urchin vision. 
the way that urchins apparently carry out eyesight - with a diffuse nerve net, where no region looks like a central processing unit - reflects how scientists are now often designing robots. “they’re finding it might be a lot better with a distributed system with many little processors and simpler sensors and simple rules, which end up creating fairly complicated behaviors as emergent properties.” [see: starlings post]” 
photos of sea urchin tests up close by paul richman. when alive, tube feet would be seen coming from the holes, which the sea urchin uses primarily for sight, with the smaller dents seen in the tests, also containing photoreceptors, used for shading and blocking light. text sources. 
awkwardsituationist:

though sea urchins don’t have eyes, they are covered in photoreceptors which collectively act as a retina, effectively making their entire bodies one big compound eye. sea urchins, one of the few marine organisms to have their genome sequenced, have about 23,000 genes (like a human), several of which are associated with sight, including those that govern the development of animal eyes. 
"comparing all the genes of the sea urchin, it’s actually quite similar to humans," said george weinstock, who led the sequencing project. they are one of the few invertebrates on the human branch of the evolutionary tree. yet interestingly, they seem to be the only example of a deuterostome to have the rhabdomeric light sensors associated with protostomes, suggesting that rhabdomeric light detectors have been the norm for eyes throughout much of the animal kingdom’s history.
"we think of animals that have a head with centralized nervous systems and all their sense organs on top as being the ones capable of sophisticated behavior, but we’re finding more and more some animals can do pretty complex behaviors using a completely different style," notes sönke johnsen, a marine biologist at duke university who conducted the study on sea urchin vision. 
the way that urchins apparently carry out eyesight - with a diffuse nerve net, where no region looks like a central processing unit - reflects how scientists are now often designing robots. “they’re finding it might be a lot better with a distributed system with many little processors and simpler sensors and simple rules, which end up creating fairly complicated behaviors as emergent properties.” [see: starlings post]” 
photos of sea urchin tests up close by paul richman. when alive, tube feet would be seen coming from the holes, which the sea urchin uses primarily for sight, with the smaller dents seen in the tests, also containing photoreceptors, used for shading and blocking light. text sources. 
awkwardsituationist:

though sea urchins don’t have eyes, they are covered in photoreceptors which collectively act as a retina, effectively making their entire bodies one big compound eye. sea urchins, one of the few marine organisms to have their genome sequenced, have about 23,000 genes (like a human), several of which are associated with sight, including those that govern the development of animal eyes. 
"comparing all the genes of the sea urchin, it’s actually quite similar to humans," said george weinstock, who led the sequencing project. they are one of the few invertebrates on the human branch of the evolutionary tree. yet interestingly, they seem to be the only example of a deuterostome to have the rhabdomeric light sensors associated with protostomes, suggesting that rhabdomeric light detectors have been the norm for eyes throughout much of the animal kingdom’s history.
"we think of animals that have a head with centralized nervous systems and all their sense organs on top as being the ones capable of sophisticated behavior, but we’re finding more and more some animals can do pretty complex behaviors using a completely different style," notes sönke johnsen, a marine biologist at duke university who conducted the study on sea urchin vision. 
the way that urchins apparently carry out eyesight - with a diffuse nerve net, where no region looks like a central processing unit - reflects how scientists are now often designing robots. “they’re finding it might be a lot better with a distributed system with many little processors and simpler sensors and simple rules, which end up creating fairly complicated behaviors as emergent properties.” [see: starlings post]” 
photos of sea urchin tests up close by paul richman. when alive, tube feet would be seen coming from the holes, which the sea urchin uses primarily for sight, with the smaller dents seen in the tests, also containing photoreceptors, used for shading and blocking light. text sources.

awkwardsituationist:

though sea urchins don’t have eyes, they are covered in photoreceptors which collectively act as a retina, effectively making their entire bodies one big compound eye. sea urchins, one of the few marine organisms to have their genome sequenced, have about 23,000 genes (like a human), several of which are associated with sight, including those that govern the development of animal eyes.

"comparing all the genes of the sea urchin, it’s actually quite similar to humans," said george weinstock, who led the sequencing project. they are one of the few invertebrates on the human branch of the evolutionary tree. yet interestingly, they seem to be the only example of a deuterostome to have the rhabdomeric light sensors associated with protostomes, suggesting that rhabdomeric light detectors have been the norm for eyes throughout much of the animal kingdom’s history.

"we think of animals that have a head with centralized nervous systems and all their sense organs on top as being the ones capable of sophisticated behavior, but we’re finding more and more some animals can do pretty complex behaviors using a completely different style," notes sönke johnsen, a marine biologist at duke university who conducted the study on sea urchin vision.

the way that urchins apparently carry out eyesight - with a diffuse nerve net, where no region looks like a central processing unit - reflects how scientists are now often designing robots. “they’re finding it might be a lot better with a distributed system with many little processors and simpler sensors and simple rules, which end up creating fairly complicated behaviors as emergent properties.” [see: starlings post]”

photos of sea urchin tests up close by paul richman. when alive, tube feet would be seen coming from the holes, which the sea urchin uses primarily for sight, with the smaller dents seen in the tests, also containing photoreceptors, used for shading and blocking light. text sources.

moreanimalia:

3liza:

Jacobin pigeon, Richard Bailey

Looking fabulous darling!
moreanimalia:

3liza:

Jacobin pigeon, Richard Bailey

Looking fabulous darling!

moreanimalia:

3liza:

Jacobin pigeon, Richard Bailey

Looking fabulous darling!

Ducks in a Row, 42” x 36”, acrylic on maple panel, 2014

In order top to bottom: Wood duck, Spectacled Eider, Mandarin duck, Buffle head, Mandarin again and finally a Harlequin duck. If you want to see more paintings like this visit www.tiffanybozic.com.

Thank you!

  1. Camera: iPhone 5
  2. Aperture: f/2.4
  3. Exposure: 1/40th
  4. Focal Length: 4mm
astronomy-to-zoology:

Spectacled Eider (Somateria fischeri)
…is a large species of sea duck native to the coasts of Alaska and Siberia. Like other sea ducks the spectacled eider dives for its meals which usually consist of molluscs and crustaceans. The spectacled eider like other eider species is sexually dimorphic as males sport a striking white, black and green coloration while females have a more modest chocolate brown coloration. During the breeding season eider pairs will move inland to tundras close to the sea to lay their young.
Phylogeny
Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Anseriformes-Anatidae-Merginae-Somateria-fischeri
Image Source(s)


I just finished another painting this time featuring ducks, my favorite being the spectacled eider. astronomy-to-zoology:

Spectacled Eider (Somateria fischeri)
…is a large species of sea duck native to the coasts of Alaska and Siberia. Like other sea ducks the spectacled eider dives for its meals which usually consist of molluscs and crustaceans. The spectacled eider like other eider species is sexually dimorphic as males sport a striking white, black and green coloration while females have a more modest chocolate brown coloration. During the breeding season eider pairs will move inland to tundras close to the sea to lay their young.
Phylogeny
Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Anseriformes-Anatidae-Merginae-Somateria-fischeri
Image Source(s)


I just finished another painting this time featuring ducks, my favorite being the spectacled eider.

astronomy-to-zoology:

Spectacled Eider (Somateria fischeri)

…is a large species of sea duck native to the coasts of Alaska and Siberia. Like other sea ducks the spectacled eider dives for its meals which usually consist of molluscs and crustaceans. The spectacled eider like other eider species is sexually dimorphic as males sport a striking white, black and green coloration while females have a more modest chocolate brown coloration. During the breeding season eider pairs will move inland to tundras close to the sea to lay their young.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Anseriformes-Anatidae-Merginae-Somateria-fischeri

Image Source(s)

I just finished another painting this time featuring ducks, my favorite being the spectacled eider.

molecularlifesciences:

scientificvisuals:

Microscopic life in a single drop of pond water. Peter Matulavich/Science Photo Library. Source here (definitely watch).

Bio-porn

astronomy-to-zoology:

Genus: Beaus

Beaus is an unusual genus of small Platygastrid wasps that occur worldwide. Adult Beaus spp. are unbelievably small and are parasitize on egg sacs of spiders of the family Lycosidae. Female Beaus spp. are wingless and phoretic, ‘riding’ on the female spider until her eggs are laid. The female will then lay her eggs inside the spider’s egg, the female wasps’s larvae will then develop inside the eggs until they reach adulthood. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Hymenoptera-Platygastroidea-Platygastridae-Scelioninae-Baeus

Images: ©tom murray and ©Ashley Bradford

So cute!

leslieseuffert:

Ben Kuhns (USA) - Ice Castles in Midway, Utah